A Prospective, Longitudinal Study of the Influence of Obesity on Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision Rate: Results from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry

Christopher J. Wall, Christopher J. Vertullo, Srinivas Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Michelle F. Lorimer, Richard N. de Steiger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of obesity with all-cause revision and revision for infection, loosening, instability, and pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) performed in Australia. METHODS: Data for patients undergoing primary TKA for osteoarthritis from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2020, were obtained from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR). The rates of all-cause revision and revision for infection, loosening, instability, and pain were compared for non-obese patients (body mass index [BMI], 18.50 to 29.99 kg/m 2 ), class-I and II obese patients (BMI, 30.00 to 39.99 kg/m 2 ), and class-III obese patients (BMI, ≥40.00 kg/m 2 ). The results were adjusted for age, sex, tibial fixation, prosthesis stability, patellar component usage, and computer navigation usage. RESULTS: During the study period, 141,673 patients underwent primary TKA for osteoarthritis in Australia; of these patients, 48.0% were class-I or II obese, and 10.6% were class-III obese. The mean age was 68.2 years, and 54.7% of patients were female. The mean follow-up period was 2.8 years. Of the 2,655 revision procedures identified, the reasons for the procedures included infection in 39.7%, loosening in 14.8%, instability in 12.0%, and pain in 6.1%. Class-I and II obese patients had a higher risk of all-cause revision (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03 to 1.22]; p = 0.007) and revision for infection (HR, 1.25 [95% CI, 1.10 to 1.43]; p = 0.001) than non-obese patients. Class-III obese patients had a higher risk of all-cause revision after 1 year (HR, 1.30 [95% CI, 1.14 to 1.52]; p < 0.001), revision for infection after 3 months (HR, 1.72 [95% CI, 1.33 to 2.17]; p < 0.001), and revision for loosening (HR, 1.39 [95% CI, 1.00 to 1.89]; p = 0.047) than non-obese patients. The risks of revision for instability and pain were similar among groups. CONCLUSIONS: Obese patients with knee osteoarthritis should be counseled with regard to the increased risks associated with TKA, so they can make informed decisions about their health care. Health services and policymakers need to address the issue of obesity at a population level. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level III . See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1386-1392
Number of pages7
JournalThe Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
Volume104
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished or Issued - 3 Aug 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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