Early or delayed time-restricted feeding prevents metabolic impact of obesity in mice

Prashant Regmi, Rajesh Chaudhary, Amanda J. Page, Amy T. Hutchison, Andrew D. Vincent, Bo Liu, Leonie Heilbronn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Time-restricted feeding (TRF) initiated early during the dark phase prevents the metabolic consequences of a high-fat diet in rodent models. However, the metabolic consequences of delaying the initiation of TRF, akin to breakfast skipping in humans, is unclear. We assigned 8-week-old male C57BL/6J mice (n = 192) to chow or high-fat diet ad libitum (AL) for 4 weeks, before randomization to continue AL or 10 h of TRF, initiated at lights off (TRFe) or 4-h after lights off (TRFd) for a further 8 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance tests (1 g/kg), metabolic monitoring and body composition by echoMRI were performed, and tissues were collected at six time points. TRF reduced weight and fat mass vs AL, with a greater reduction in TRFe vs TRFd. TRF improved glucose tolerance and protected mice from high-fat diet-induced hepatosteatosis v s AL, with no difference between TRFe and TRFd. TRF increased the amplitude of Bmal1, Cry1, Per2, Nampt, and Nocturnin mRNA levels in liver. A phase delay in Bmal1, Cry1, Per2, Reverbα, Nampt, NAD, Sirt1, and Nocturnin was observed in TRFd. Thus, delaying TRF limited the weight be nefit and induced a phase delay in the hepatic clock, but improved metabolic health. Allowing more flexibility in when TRF is initiated may increase the trans lational potential of this dietary approach in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-86
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Endocrinology
Volume248
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished or Issued - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Circadian delay
  • Circadian rhythms
  • Metabolic disease
  • Obesity
  • Time-restricted feeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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