Maternal and neonatal outcomes following the introduction of the Fetal Pillow at a tertiary maternity hospital: A retrospective cohort study

Kathrina Y.L. Chooi, Andrea R. Deussen, Jennie Louise, Sarah Cash, Jodie M. Dodd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Caesarean birth at full cervical dilatation can be technically challenging and may be associated with increased risks of maternal and neonatal morbidity, often secondary to difficulties in delivering a deeply impacted fetal head. The Fetal Pillow is a device designed to elevate an impacted fetal head out of the pelvis and reduce birth trauma. Aims: To evaluate birth outcomes following the introduction of the Fetal Pillow at a tertiary maternity hospital. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cohort study included all caesarean births at full cervical dilatation where the Fetal Pillow was utilised and compared with caesarean births where the Fetal Pillow was not used from October 2018 to December 2019. Maternal outcomes included uterine incision extension, blood loss, high dependency unit admission and postoperative length of stay. Neonatal outcomes included Apgar scores, resuscitation, cord arterial blood pH and lactate, nursery admission, birth trauma, jaundice and seizures. Results: There were 53 caesarean births where the Fetal Pillow was utilised and 48 where it was not. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups with mean maternal age across both groups of 30.4 (±5.3) years, mean gestational age at birth of 39.5 (±1.2) weeks and mean infant birth weight of 3543 (±441) g. There were no statistically significant differences between the two study groups for the maternal and neonatal outcomes considered. Conclusions: There was no evidence that use of the Fetal Pillow to elevate an impacted fetal head during caesarean birth when cervical dilatation is >7 cm was associated with a reduced rate of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-364
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished or Issued - Jun 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • caesarean section
  • delivery, obstetric
  • dilatation
  • morbidity
  • newborn, infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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